July Newsletter

Dear Friends of Kingston Inner Harbour,

Here’s a bit of what’s coming up in July:

1) KAIROS BLANKET EXERCISE – July 7 in park
2) TURTLE PROJECTS – Social get-together in park July 12 (See pic of  Inner Harbour Northern Maps at end of update)
3) K&P TRAIL- CITY CONSTRUCTION THIS SUMMER:
4) HEALTHY FOOD FOR DUCKS AND GEESE
5) TRAILHEAD’S “PADDLE AND PINT” WEDNESDAYS
6) CITY OF KINGSTON PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT SURVEY
7) VISION FOR KINGSTON FACEBOOK PAGE
8) HERITAGE PIECE RE VALUE OF DOUG FLUHRER PARK
9) NORTH KINGSTOWN SECONDARY PLAN LINK
10) PARKING RATIOS IN DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENTS
11) MARINE MUSEUM UPDATE
12) HISTORIC MASONRY WORK AT KINGSTON MILLS

1) KAIROS BLANKET EXERCISE:
Thurs,July 7, 5:30-8:00 pm, Doug Fluhrer Park:

The KAIROS Blanket Exercise is a one hour long consciousness raising intercultural participatory workshop to help participants better understand Truth and Reconciliation.  It examines how colonization of Canada has impacted the people who lived here long before settlers arrived. Participants will explore the nation-to-nation relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Canada, how this relationship has been damaged over the years,and how we can work toward reconciliation.”. Hosted by the Friends of Kingston Inner Harbour in partnership with Peacequest and Four Directions Aboriginal Student Centre.  All welcome.
Organizer: Jolene Cheryl Simko.
More info? info@friendsofinnerharbour.com.
Poster: http://www.kairoscanada.org/event/kairos-blanket-exercise-kingston
(Rain location; Common Room of Frontenac Village condo.
(To get to the condo, go as far north as you can on King St. to the entry to the condo parking garage beside OHIP.  You will find directions there to the common room – but only if it is raining!)  Light refreshments provided at 5:30.  Contributions welcome.
Main event starts at 5:50 and lasts approximately one hour.
This is NOT a drop-in-at-any-time event!  Don’t be late!

2) TURTLE PROJECTS:
a) The Turtle Awareness Evening on June 7 was a wonderful success despite the showery weather.  Thanks so much to Georgina Riel and Jolie Brant from the National Aboriginal Day committee for coming and sharing stories about the importance of the turtle in Aboriginal cultures and for their craft – painting rocks as turtles.  Thanks also to Anne Robertson of the Kingston Field Naturalists for her display materials including turtle shells and preserved eggs and hatchlings.   And thanks to the Boys and Girls Club, Minotaur and Living Rooms for the use of their tents.  Totally needed! PIctures available at Snap’d – http://snapd.at/eeww4y

b) Toonies for Turtles campaign: Also hugely successful!  Thanks so much to the over 40 volunteers who have been helping out by phoning in sightings and by covering nests.  So very much appreciated! Also wonderful to have had the publicity in the Kingston Whig Standard and in Kingston This Week about the “Turtle Lady” – http://www.thewhig.com/2016/06/23/meet-the-turtle-lady.  Thanks to Michael Lea for that.
Thanks are also due to members of the turtle committee, Matt Ellerbeck, Vicki Schmolka, Anne Powers, Serena Manson, Kathleen Satchell and Audrey Helmstaedt who helped arrange informative school visits, create window displays at Novel Idea and the Minotaur, “man” the table at the Skeleton Park Arts Festival, and help cover the many nests.  And finally – special thanks to Diane, Dorothy and Kathleen for their extensive time spent covering nests.  All wonderful!
See pic of Northern Maps at end of update
– courtesy Herb Helmstaedt.

c) We are now planning an informal get-together in Doug Fluhrer Park on Tues, July 12, from 5:30 – 8:00Rain location will be in the Common Room of Frontenac Village Condo.  (To get to the condo, go as far north as you can on King St. to the entry to our parking garage beside OHIP.  You will find directions there to the common room – but only if it is raining!)  Light refreshments provided – although if anyone would like to bring a snack to share that would be fun. At this time we also plan on pulling up the nest covers so as to ensure that no hatchlings are trapped.  The first nest we covered was on June 4 and gestation takes 60 days so we should be in good shape.  We also need to take pictures and count the nests as there have been so many we have lost count!  Again we are grateful to Herb Helmstaedt for volunteering to take pictures. AND – we have eleven old chairs and paint.  We would love it if some of you would like to paint turtles on the chairs for us to leave in the park for anyone to use for the rest of the summer.

3) K&P TRAIL CONSTRUCTION THIS SUMMER:
Starting on Monday (June 13) work began behind the homes and businesses on Rideau Street (north of River Street /south of the Railway/Montreal intersection) as part of the Urban K & P Trail extension. Work included garbage and debris removal, clearing and grubbing and fill placement to stabilize the slope. According to Wikipedia grubbing means more than getting rid of grubs. It is “the removal of trees, shrubs, stumps and rubbish from the future right-of-way of a transportation corridor.”
A huge swath of trees and shrubs has been cut down extending from the actual rail trail all the way to the backs of the buildings on RIdeau St.  When I first saw it I was honestly heartbroken.  What was the most beautiful cycling trail in the entire city now looks like a war zone.  There are also mounds of earth being imported from the trail section on Dalton.  They will be bulldozed into a slope so that the low cliff face on the west side of the trail will be covered and the ground will slope down to the trail.  Evidently environmental restrictions prohibit retaining the old rail gravel and the entire surface will be covered before the 3m wide asphalt trail is completed.  It will be planted with Native shade trees and shrubs.  It will look OK in 3-4 years I am told. FYI, When I expressed my concerns to both Neal Unworth, Manager of Parks, and several councillors, Neal’s explanation was:

“When we purchased this particular piece of land we inherited a significant legacy of garbage dumping, encroachments, slope stability and drainage challenges that are being remediated as part of the development of the edge of the new pathway so that the lands adjacent to the trail can be maintained and the experience can be safe for trail users. The brush was predominantly Manitoba Maple and we completed a detailed arborist evaluation to ensure that the removals were done to best practices and that no significant or threatened tree species were impacted. A biologist was present on site and also completed a pre-assessment of bird nesting activity in this area prior to any work commencing to ensure that we were not impacting any protected birds under the Migratory Birds Act.
There will be an extensive naturalization program done where we will be bringing back a very high order of plant material diversity and natural interest to this site. There will be hundreds of trees and shrubs planted as part of the project….  It is standard practice for such clearing to be done for pathway projects. The rural K&P Trail project, in 2007 and 2010, underwent a very similar approach and the brush re-established to its natural form in very short order.”

For me personally this section will seem overbuilt. One consolation is that when the rest of Belle Park trail construction occurs at some point in the future, it will be gravel, not asphalt. Also, the trail construction on Dalton looks great.  The trail will be separated from the road by 1 metre of grass.
Construction has begun.  Go and have a look.
More info? Neal Unsworth – nunsworth@cityofkingston.ca or 613-546-4291, x1811
One last thing:  If you have suggestions as to what sorts of trees, shrubs, grasses etc. you would like to see planted, please get in touch – inverarymary@yahoo.com.
It’s nice that we can have a say in this!

4) HEALTHY FOOD FOR DUCKS AND GEESE:
Now that summer has come, I just wanted to give you all a friendly reminder: don’t feed ducks bread! It is very unhealthy and can lead to many health complications- often resulting in a painful death. Below is a list of healthier options, if you feel it is absolutely necessary to feed them. I get that it’s a fun thing to do with kids, so try some of these out instead:
-Cracked corn
-Wheat, barley or similar grains
-Oats (uncooked; rolled or quick)
-Rice (cooked or uncooked)
-Milo seed
-Birdseed (any type or mix)
-Grapes (cut in half or quartered if very large)
-Nut hearts or pieces (any type but without salt or flavoring)
-Frozen peas or corn (defrosted, no need to cook)
-Earthworms
-Mealworms (fresh or dried)
-Chopped lettuce or other greens or salad mixes
-Vegetable trimmings or peels (chopped)
-Duck feed pellets or poultry starter pellets are another great option, and they can be purchased from farming or agricultural supply stores.

5) TRAILHEAD’S really fun “PADDLE AND PINT”: WEDNESDAY EVENINGS THROUGHOUT THE SUMMER:
More info?  http://www.trailheadkingston.ca/SS-courses.html

6) CITY OF KINGSTON PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT SURVEY:
The city is interested in how you would like to see public engagement improved.  Here is the link to their survey: http://www.cityofkingston.ca/city-hall/get-involved/engagement-survey

7) VISION FOR KINGSTON FACEBOOK PAGE:
The Board of the Friends of Kingston Inner Harbour believes unanimously in Human Scale architecture that is in keeping with  the heritage feel of the downtown.  We support increasing population density appropriately by filling in the over 60 empty lots in the downtown with mid rises and infills rather than concentrating density in a couple of blocks in the downtown with inappropriate 20 storey high rises and the consequent worsening of traffic congestion.  We also believe that a better location for high rises is the Kingston Centre given that Princess St. is a ramp to the downtown from there.  In addition, that location has space, great views and is a transit hub.  We would also like to see some city incentives for smaller builders interested in developing those empty lots.  Let’s think outside the box when we think densification. Have a look at the Vision for Kingston Facebook page for discussion of this issue. What do you think?

8) LINK TO PIECE IN “HERITAGE” RE VALUE OF DOUG FLUHRER PARK AS LARGE EVENT VENUE:
http://www.kingstonregion.com/opinion-story/6749575-doug-fluhrer-park-is-a-community-asset-and-deserves-to-be-treated-as-such/

9) LINK TO NORTH KING’S TOWN SECONDARY PLAN:
https://www.cityofkingston.ca/city-hall/projects-construction/north-kings-town/about
Do feel free to contact city planners Paige Agnew, Greg Newman and Sonya Bolton as well as Antonio Gomez-Palacio, lead planner at DIALOG design, with your ideas.
They would like to hear from as many people as possible: pagnew@cityofkingston.ca, gnewman@cityofkingston.ca, sbolton@cityofkingston,ca and agp@dialogdesign.ca

10) MARINE MUSEUM UPDATE:
CITY COUNCIL, JUNE 29, 2016:

https://www.cityofkingston.ca/documents/10180/14685445/COU_A1816-16235.pdf/78a76f5c-4f9a-469c-9684-174b6e73a8b2

11) PARKING RATIOS FOR NEW DEVELOPMENTS
KINGSTON, ONT./June 27, 2016 – The City of Kingston invites local builders and residents to a meeting on proposed updates to parking ratios for building projects in the Williamsville Main Street, downtown and harbour areas and the Cash-in-Lieu of Parking Bylaw.
Meeting: 9 am,Thurs, July 14, Meeting Rm C, INVISTA Centre, 1350 Gardiners Rd. RSVP by Friday, July 8 by emailing LeighAnn Hoegi at <mailto:lhoegi@cityofkingston.ca>.
There may also be a meeting in the afternoon at Artillery Park.  Time and location to be confirmed.  Contact Marnie: mvenditti@cityofkingston.ca.
“Because the City wants to continue to encourage intensification in its core, we need to find a fair way to address the potential parking demand associated with greater use of our downtown and Williamsville areas,” says Marnie Venditti, senior manager, client relations and development services.
Builders are required to supply a certain number of parking spaces for a site under development.

The proposed updates outline suggested parking ratios that are appropriate for the types of redevelopment expected in these areas and reflect active transportation options, such as transit, cycling and walking. The updated parking ratios will provide a basis for an updated Cash-in-Lieu of Parking Bylaw and offer an additional opportunity for builders to meet the number of parking spaces required for their building site.
The City’s planning division and transportation services department have been working with the consultant MMM Group to finalize the proposed updates to the bylaws which will change a number of the parking ratios required by City zoning and expand the City’s Cash-in-Lieu of Parking Bylaw’s scope and area.

An information report on this effort will go to the planning committee at its July 7 meeting and the associated reports will be made available ahead of the meeting on the planning committee’s page at <http://www.CityofKingston.ca<http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.CityofKingston.ca%2F&h=dAQHSlsLfAQFxbnXrcUAKgvwbSRfolZ9uuNQJclyU4lbveg&enc=AZMO3cUo7SIiD5S8tHFSwo5IyEV2jy43Q2kDlHDuR0wyyOb9DOjFhFrL7aDTdWug_KnOIU-C2rzWrc7FdHBC-HdNk07kyNbUAI2aL0npv05kTopwjl7l_orawoF2hw0RKTB1tIqSXy16zC4WnYXU3nBVFPKsk08ll4gnkdRWjP9VyQ&s=1>>.
Marnie Venditti, MCIP, RPP
Senior Manager, Client Relations & Development Services
Building Planning and Licensing Services

11) HISTORIC MASONRY WORK AT KINGSTON MILLS:
Smith’s Falls, Ontario, May 19, 2016: Parks Canada is pleased to announce the completion of repairs to historic masonry at Kingston Mills Arch Dam and Upper Brewers Lock 43.
Kingston Mills Arch Dam Resurfacing: At Kingston Mills, contractors resurfaced the arch dam’s concrete cap, preserving an original feature of the site constructed in the late 1820s. The aged concrete cap, that had become severely cracked and worn over time, has now been replaced with coloured and textured concrete to blend with the historic ‘Kingston Blue Limestone’ forming the dams.
Upper Brewers Lock 43 Repairs: Upper Brewers Lock  was originally built in the 1820s and 1830s using sandstone masonry. Major repairs undertaken over a century ago incorporated limestone into several of the walls. After many years, the lock walls demonstrated natural degeneration of the sandstone, limestone and mortar. Stone repair and mortar replacement were undertaken to ensure the continued structural integrity and functionality of the lock. Using carefully selected and historically accurate materials, these repairs will ensure that future generations will be able to enjoy the historic masonry at this location.

These infrastructure projects are part of Parks Canada’s unprecedented investment of $3 billion dollars over 5 years to support work to heritage, visitor, waterway and highway assets located within national historic sites, national parks, and national marine conservation areas across Canada.
A Brief History of Kingston Mills: In 1784, to support new Loyalist settlers, the British Government built a saw mill and grist mill at what is now known as Kingston Mills. In 1824, plans for locks along the Cataraqui River were developed to accommodate steamboat navigation. During the excavation of swamp lands, nearly 100 men were infected and 13 men died of malaria. As such, Colonel By adopted a new plan to raise the arch dam, reducing the need for locks between Kingston Mills and Lower Brewers Mills. Large blocks of stone were laid on end and sealed with a clay, gravel and sand mixture to form the watertight barrier for the 400 foot arch dam. Historically, the dam provided a basin of water required to operate the grist mill located downstream. Presently, it supports a hydro generating facility.
A Brief History of Upper Brewers Locks 43-44: In the early 1820s, John Brewer developed the area that is today the Upper and Lower Brewers locks. By 1826 the area had a sawmill, grist mill, and operating distillery. In the mid-1820s John Brewer was awarded the contract to build the Locks and came up against similar challenges to those at Kingston Mills. Workers were ravaged by dysentery, malaria, black flies and mosquitoes.

Both Upper Brewers Locks and Kingston Mills Arch Dam are a testament to the efforts of the many labourers who made great sacrifices to build these impressive structures. They are representative of the rich cultural heritage that is woven into Parks Canada’s many historic assets. Investments in the preservation, rehabilitation, and restoration of our national historic sites will protect our heritage and strengthen their appeal as destinations to celebrate our nation’s achievements.
More Info?  Christie Ulicn, Public Relations and Communications Officer, Ontario Waterways, Parks Canada, (705) 750-4883, christie.ulicny@pc.gc.ca

As always, thanks so very much for your interest and involvement. Much appreciated.
Cheers,
Mary Farrar,
President, Friends of Kingston Inner Harbour
www.friendsofinnerharbour.com